Once he set the novel in the hot region of North Africa and had captured our belief in its existence, he began recreating Oran and its people in Western terms. It is Tarrou who will supply the details to fill in the broader narrative outlines of Rieux. This idea of not wasting time and of infusing the utmost consciousness into the present moment is an important existential tenet. Love, for Camus, is a mixture of "desire, affection, and intelligence." By presenting another viewpoint, that of someone who has no family or loved ones affected by the plague to color his account in his notebooks, the truth of "what happened" will be more nearly correct. The tone here is low-keyed because the narrator is speaking of the normal day-to-day process of dying. For an informed analysis of The Plague, we need to look at some background to Camus’ philosophy in two other essays, one published before The Plague and one after. He did not discover Cottard as a result of his coming for a friendly visit. Removing #book# Because of fear? Web. The taste of death in the town has invigorated him. These people Camus describes are recognizable as Americans and as western Europeans. Close identification, a major objective for most fiction authors, is to be avoided because emotional involvement will keep us from seeing the book as, at least, a three-dimensional allegory. Rieux has proven himself to be a man of logic; this pondering is quite in character. He will tell, he says, "what happened." His determination to be simply efficient and thorough is his answer for the present — doing one's job as it should be done. It is at this point that one should revolt against his stultifying pattern of living. Camus is teasing our suspense. The death figure drops, then spurts up sharply. Albert Camus's The Plague Plot Summary. Camus and The Plague. The citizens of Oran become prisoners of the plague when their city falls under total quarantine, but it is questionable whether they were really "free" before the plague. Why Tarrou singles out this particular instance to comment on is fairly obvious. Once more, as a point of reference, Camus' earlier fictional character of Meursault won't ask for a transfer; neither does Grand ask for salary raises or advancements. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of The Plague. Madame Rieux The mother of Dr. Rieux. Before Oran is finally quarantined, Dr. Rieux confronts one more tangle in the local snarl of red tape. This chapter is a kind of didactic catch-all for Camus-Rieux to vent personal feelings about the plague and all its implications. Grand, in contrast, does not. The first dead rat begins the chapter; the first victim ends it. Rieux then insists that they must act "as if" it is plague. The Plague is a novel by Albert Camus that was written in 1947, two years after the end of World War II. A fear that they will be "rough" with him? Grand reports that a complete change has taken place in the man and Rieux does some firsthand observing. Non-American Author Research: The Plague by Albert Camus The Plague by Albert Camus is a novel that forms themes around human suffering, greed, and religion. Officially, rats and fleas are to be exterminated; illnesses resembling the mysterious fever are to be reported and patients isolated. This is a wholly new experience and he savors it. The Plague (Penguin Classics). Even before the crises that the plague will create, here is a crisis of major importance — a crisis for truth. Both men are, strictly speaking, nobodies — statistics, figuratively; actually, counters of statistics. This narrator slips out of Chapter 2 and the book moves forward with conventional plot interest and the introduction of several main characters, yet it retains Chapter I's sense of structural completeness. Once they do become aware of it, they must decide what measures they will take to fight the deadly disease. Rieux seems isolated — in miniature, a situation akin to the total isolation which the plague will eventually impose upon Oran. Most of Oran talks, scribbles, and muscles their days into ample financial rewards. Irritated that Dr. Richard would sarcastically accuse him of having proven the disease to be plague, Rieux insists that he has not proven plague. And since Camus has lamented that man's imagination has ceased to function, perhaps the reader would do well to expand it here in this trapped, sizzling, "normal" situation of death and imagine the eventual effect of the plague. This study guide and infographic for Albert Camus's The Plague offer summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. The blood leaking from their mouths reminds him of his wife's illness and her imminent trip to a mountain sanatorium. The townspeople of Oran insist that the rats are surely meaningless, whereas the rats are extremely meaningful. Be assured, before you take up this book, that however fearful COVID-19 may be, it is nowhere near as destructive as Camus’s plague. He describes the blood puddles around their noses as looking like red flowers. The doctor patiently fights the plague, but is often confused about his duty: he, as the doctor, is supposed to save people, but in the case of plague, he just has a chance to isolate them from the healthy ones, and record their death. He does not undergo here a metamorphosis and emerge something much grander than before. CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams. At present, he admits that he works for a newspaper that compromises with truth. The swollen ganglia which he sees recurring are often lanced and disgorge a mixture of blood and pus. The narrator's insistence on the book's objectivity stresses his wish to present the truth, as nearly as possible. Analysis The Plague Albert Camus English Literature Essay “Through a core of characters, Camus describes their fear, their confusion, their isolation from the loved ones and the outside world, their self-sufficiency, their compassion, and their ultimately inherent humanism as a … Camus was not, however, to faithfully render Oran much further than geographically locating it for the reader. The mention of a "normal" dying man, "trapped behind hundreds of walls all sizzling with heat," suggests the mazes of Dante's hell, mazes which must be traversed before the plague's thousands of deaths are tolled. © 2020 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Camus conceived of the universe in terms of paradoxes and … This technique, it is worth noting, is somewhat similar to that of a Greek tragedy. Very briefly, we also meet in this chapter the senile, chuckling old Spaniard. Further, he says he will ask, as a favor for the man, that the police inspector hold up the inquiry for a couple of days. In this sense, man is sacred, but absurdly sacred; he may die in any moment, just as love may disappear within a moment. He shrugs away the matter, saying "it'll pass." The plague is an enigma to the doctor. Rieux includes a brief physical description of himself written by Tarrou, and then ends the chapter which seems, on the whole, somewhat fragmentary. His defense is with a semantic shield. Empty phrases that he gropes forward with — phrases like "his grim resolve" and "his secret grief," phrases that border on being clichés. Later the Oranians become vaguely uneasy. As he watches and listens, it is the sea he hears most clearly as it murmurs with unrest, affirming "the precariousness of all things in this world." Grand's character takes on ambiguous shapes. He read the shocking chalk-scrawled note on Cottard's door and dashed in. In Chapter 8, the plague and municipal efforts play tick-tack-toe. Only then can they perform responsibly and efficiently. Analysis Of The Plague By Albert Camus 1101 Words5 Pages The novel, The Plague, written by Albert Camus, will be the focal point of the Multicultural essay. The Plague's first chapter is a rather neat, concise package of setting and background, and Chapter 2 is, in a sense, another such block of writing, somewhat like a second solid step taken into the novel, but with a difference. At last word comes from the head of officialdom — Rieux's efforts to convince the proper authority that an epidemic has begun are rewarded — the town is to be severed, totally isolated. This inconsequentiality, however — isn't this, in a broad sense, definitive of Oran? Camus, however, had good reason for beginning his work with just such a contrast. Camus' The Plague is an uncannily prescient description of the world of COVID-19, giving us reasons for reflection, and finally for hope. A modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, SuperSummary offers high-quality study guides that feature detailed chapter summaries and analysis of major themes, characters, quotes, and essay topics. His try at imagining the annihilation of five movie houses of people is an attempt to arrive at something concrete and meaningful. He is totally pledged to the populace, but not even yet does he divine what it is that hovers over Oran. Summary Analysis The central irony in The Plague lies in Camus' treatment of "freedom." The Plague, is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran.It asks a number of questions relating to the nature of destiny, and the human condition. Earlier, he has said "one's got to help a neighbor, hasn't one?" Use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. The doctor patiently fights the plague, but is often confused about his duty: he, as the doctor, is supposed to save people, but in the case of plague, he just has a chance to isolate them from the healthy ones, and record their death. Perhaps because he is so near death himself, he enjoys with relish the instinctive feeling that he will not die alone but with numerous companions. It is, however, Rieux's early indifference to the rats which eventually passes. The citizens of Oran become prisoners of the plague when their city falls under total quarantine, but it is questionable whether they were really "free" before the plague. Before, they simply took their loved ones for granted. Tarrou's suggestion that one might profitably remain on a balcony during a Sunday afternoon is reminiscent of what Meursault of Camus' The Stranger does on Sunday afternoon — watching, looking, seeing. Two things are done here with Grand. As a reader, you might consider how he would view the old Spaniard who carefully puts dried peas from one pot to another. Then, from this confrontation, new values regarding living will emerge. Grand seems paradoxical. This is, in a sense, what Camus is doing in the opening scenes of The Plague. The chronicle’s unknown narrator eventually reveals himself as Dr. Rieux, who has been trying to take a more detached view of the plague. She survives. Albert Camus, though denying the tag of existentialism, was and still is a great name amongst French existentialist authors who helped sculpt and define the movement in literature. Camus’s novel has fresh relevance and urgency—and lessons to give. All imaginations cope ineffectually with such a figure, but the doctor's problem is compounded by the fact that he deals daily in death and has seen the raw damage that statistics are charted from. More important, he is a questioner and a self-examiner. Albert Camus's novel The Plague is about an epidemic of bubonic plague that takes place in the Al-gerian port city of Oran.When the plague first arrives, the residents are slow to recognize the mortal danger they are in. One knows what he encounters when he swims. Tarrou, besides liking musicians, sees Oran as a town built of physical ugliness and of a sterile commercial spirit. bookmarked pages associated with this title. It is also underscored in the first chapter. Nevertheless, Camus did believe that people are capable of giving their lives meaning. Nature seems indifferent to the mushrooming fungus of destruction. That the rats themselves mean something more serious is ignored by the general population. Camus, however, had good reason for beginning his work with just such a contrast. In this paper, I would like to discuss such character of Camus’ novel The Plague as Joseph Grand. Their lives were strictly regimented by an unconscious enslavement to their habits. Exile and the Kingdom; Battle Against Crisis at the Conclusion of The Plague; Ideological Tenacity in The Plague; The Absurd and the Concept of Hope in Camus's Novels; The Plague as Double Allegory Analysis Of Albert Camus 'BookThe Plague' 1424 Words | 6 Pages. Where Tarrou has come from is a mystery, but after several days of minute observation of the city, he writes: "At last!" The atmosphere is as oppressive as a sickroom. Indeed, this thorough and methodical attitude will continue throughout his dealings with the plague. As the plague gently begins its slaughter, Dr. Rieux discovers in Chapter 4 that he must battle another plague-like phenomenon — the so-called red tape of bureaucracy. Vital living can be stifled by habits: in Oran, love-making is relegated to the weekends. Having briefly illuminated Oran's life and love, the next focus is naturally enough on the other end of the human cycle — death. He merely replied "a secret grief," and refused to look at the officer. He speculates on a musician who continues to play his trombone after he knows that his lungs are dangerously weak. Still, it had decimated the city in the 16th century and the 17th. The Plague, or La Peste in its original French, is a novel written by philosopher/writer Albert Camus in 1947. Camus' The Plague is an uncannily prescient description of the world of COVID-19, giving us reasons for reflection, and finally for hope. He even admits that his heart responds whenever he recalls his deceased parents. New York: Penguin Classics, 2006. In the early days of the epidemic, the citizens of Oran are indifferent to one another's suffering because each person is selfishly convinced that his or her pain is unique compared to "common" suffering. This isolation of Rieux and of Oran is buttressed by one of Camus' exacting images. This is the careful, exact quality in Rieux that we have seen previously. Note: This is a summary and analysis of The Rebel and not the original work.The Rebel is a 1951 book-length essay by Albert Camus, which treats both the metaphysical and the historical development of rebellion and revolution in societies, especially Western Europe. He lacks almost all sense of commercial survival. Marina Warnerhas noted the lack of female characters and th… His coming-to-terms with whatever has invaded Oran must be accomplished soon, but with reason and observation. Plague never enters his head. Rieux modifies his seeming indecision by saying that the symptoms are not "classic," and at this point his purist view is alarming. However, Camus' novel declares that this rebellion is nonetheless a noble, meaningful struggle even if it means facing never-ending defeat. He is relieved, you remember, when Rieux says that he will protect him. Rieux admits that he is afraid. The reality is like a bad dream — absurd. Albert Camus: The Plague - Summary and Commentary from an Existentialist and Humanist Point of View Bubonic plague is a disease caused by the bacterium, Yersinia pestis. Although, most of the cultural points in this novel are based off of the authors own traditions and culture, the major things to focus on are the differences between history, culture, and religious beliefs between the novel and Oran, Algeria. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of The Plague. In fact, Camus says later that the rats were coming out in long swaying lines and doing "a sort of pirouette." And if fatality is wretched normally, imagine what discomfort will be encountered during the pages of this long chronicle of death. Is it, however, Grand who has admirable feelings toward his fellow men or is it Rieux? Camus wrote early on, in an essay entitled Le Desert, about “repugnant materialism”. In January 1941, the twenty-eight year old French writer Albert Camus began work on a novel about a virus that spreads uncontrollably from animals to humans and ends up destroying half the population of a representative modern town. The Plague, on the other hand, is more satisfying on the literal level because of its specifically placed setting, and, in addition, the literal level has more concern for the human condition than, say, the literal level of Gulliver's Travels. It is difficult during these Covid days not to recall his most famous novel The Plague (1947) which describes the outbreak of a terrible disease which ravaged the population of Oran in North Africa, resulting in its isolation and shut down. The central irony in The Plague lies in Camus' treatment of "freedom." And yet The Plague ultimately makes for edifying reading in this time of quarantine. But he is not alone. The doomed citizens, shut off and abandoned to die, cope with various strategies as the months drag on their languished souls. Before leaving this chapter, there are two more incidents of credit for the doctor. and suggested a Samaritan attitude. Fear of the future? (Camus 44) Rieux stays, faces his fear of death, and stays altruistic to fill the duty of being a doctor. Jean Tarrou, on the other hand, is intrigued. of being alone? Camus himself loved the sea; when he swam in it, he encountered it nakedly and boldly, in a way virtually impossible to encounter society. Word games are ridiculous now. Camus and The Plague - Articles from The School of Life, formally The Book of Life, a gathering of the best ideas around wisdom and emotional intelligence. His thoughts of fellow Athenians fighting one another centuries ago for burial rite space for their dead foreshadows a like battle he will fight when he attempts to properly care for the sick and dying. This is, in a sense, what Camus is doing in the opening scenes of The Plague. La Peste = The Plague, Albert Camus The Plague is a novel by Albert Camus, published in 1947, that tells the story of a plague sweeping the French Algerian city of Oran. Referring once more to Oran's position on the sea, he says that it is humped "snail-wise" on the plateau. The Plague concerns an outbreak of bubonic plague in the French-Algerian port city of Oran, sometime in the 1940s. This minute — now — this is what matters. Further delving into Albert Camus and his life, he was a French philosopher, author, and journalist. In addition, Camus is striving for an esthetic distance between the reader and the novel which will keep the reader an observer. Even the population seem indifferent as they perform their habitual, meaningless gestures. The character focus of the book is not wholly on Dr. Rieux, but because he is, in disguise, the narrator, he assumes a kind of early main character or hero focal point. This Study Guide consists of approximately 75 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Plague. The symbol is that of the German occupation of France against which Camus fought so heroically during the war. Being poor, Grand is not charged for the doctor's visits. His novel can be seen as an allegory about French resistance to the Nazi’s during World War 2. Rieux is also convinced that the victims of the unidentified fever should be put in isolation, yet he is stopped because of his colleagues' insistence that there is no definite proof that the disease is dangerously infectious. In the face of such a seemingly meaningless choice, between death and death, the fact that they make a choice to act and fight for themselves and their community becomes even more meaningful; it is a note of defiance thrown against the wind, but that note is the only thing through which someone can define himself. His role will enlarge as the story develops. For the present, he records the snatches of shallow gossip in Oran: the decay of the rats' bodies is seen as the only danger. Holed up in his room, he pours over volumes of philology. In any case, the reader should note that Camus does not single out lovers clinging together during a plague situation to snare his readers' attention. The story is narrated to us by an odd, nameless narrator strangely obsessed with objectivity, who tends to focus on a man named Dr. Bernard Rieux. of the past? What Camus’s The Plague can teach us about the Covid-19 pandemic A conversation about solidarity and revolt in Camus’s famous novel. He now eats in luxury restaurants and flourishes grand tips. Albert Camus' vision in The Plague was bleak, but his study in terrorism is also a fable of redemption, finds Marina Warner Buy The Plague at Amazon.co.uk Sat 26 Apr 2003 18.35 EDT For Meursault, that time is spent swimming, going to the movies, and making love. This objective tone is particularly important because by underplaying the sensationalism of the plague, he hopes to startle our intellect more completely to its lessons. The rats, they say, are disgusting, obnoxious, and a nuisance. 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